March 5, 2024
Reviewing The JEANRICHARD Terrascope

Our Terrascope enjoys a luxurious construction, and the black dial may be the dressiest of the bunch, giving it more of an urban jungle predilection than of the jungles of South America.JEANRICHARD’s stated philosophy is “A new way of conceiving time. Caught up in the joy of discovery.” These watches are made for rugged exploration. Lacking male models in pinstripes to highlight the watch’s sophistication, we photographed it outside in its natural habitat, terra firma.

The JR Calibre: 11 ½ is a modified Sellita movement as opposed to the JR 1000, their only in-house movement used in their 1681 collection. As would be expected, the Calibre 11 ½ has 26 jewels, a 38 hour power reserve, and a 4hz frequency. Though nothing fancy, the watch boasts time tested specifications, giving it a workhorse movement for reliability.

Reviewing The JEANRICHARD Terrascope

This watch grew on us with each passing day. For a watch that has an endless supply of plain smooth steel, there was always something new to discover – a great testament to its design. First, there was the light, the gleam; then came the unfolding discovery of all the shapes, lines and geometry of an architect’s world; and finally the dial held a level of sophistication to match the overall testosterone. The only problem with reviewing such a watch is having to send it back.

Reviewing The JEANRICHARD Terrascope
New for the Terrascope is the distinctive black dial with its brushed-finish to match the satin-finished steel sections. Visually, the black dial seems the apotheosis of the Terrascope collection, which offers traditional dial colors like white or bolder choices like blue, dark green or aubergine, but the brushed black dial has a wow-factor that stays with you.

The mechanical features of the watch are straightforward: hour, minute, second with a date complication. The real features, however, are visual. For instance, when you view the dial from directly overhead, all you can see is stain-finished steel except for the outer polished edge, which continues onto the lugs. Rotate the watch on the wrist, and along the sides of the terraced case, new outlines of mirror-polished steel sparkle like facets on a diamond. At the top is an elevated round bezel, extending from an intermediate layer of four corners (think square), and at the bottom is a cushion-like foundation with curved sides much like parentheses. The 3-D effect of the outer case with its many edges looks like an architectural sketch. Normally fitting a round peg in a square hole is a bad idea, but the geometric shapes here defy convention.

Reviewing The JEANRICHARD Terrascope
The crown vaunts the JR logo, which is also etched on the case back. The crown has a beveled edge with deep wells, some of the only texture visible, but they are more for look than grip. Deploying the crown was a bit tricky because it was hard to grasp. Approaching it from the top and inserting a nail worked best, but it took trial-and-error to settle on this method.

The steel bracelet, despite the added grams of weight, makes the watch ultra-masculine. Can’t get to the gym? Just do curls with your Terrascope. The steel bracelet combines the same interplay of polished and brushed satin steel, its inner edges playing peek-a-boo with the polish. Since gleam is the selling point over texture, the steel bezel solidifies this theme 360 degrees around the wrist, and without a buckle for the butterfly release, the bracelet runs seamlessly from end to end.

On the dial, the index batons resemble the hands in their skeletal sandwiching of the applied lume with the ends left uncovered for greater visibility. Matching the outer 3-D appearance is the chapter ring’s inner slope with Arabic second/minute numerals in increments of five. The index at three o’clock is shortened to accommodate the date window, and kudos to JR for a black background and white date numbers.

Reviewing The JEANRICHARD Terrascope

The cushion case is signature JR DNA. Though no one would mistake this watch for a Patek Philippe Nautilus, they do seem to be telling a similar story; comparison, however, ends at a cursory, overall impression. Side by side, they are two completely different designs. The Terrascope is 46mm and with the bracelet, qualifies for the heavy weight division at 220 grams. The watch is a beast. Remember, it is bred for outdoor adventure.

The bold look of the case back’s engraved JEANRICHARD logo fits with the watch’s scale and contrasts against a matt background. The eight indentions for case back removal create a symmetry around the circumference and add to the watch’s tough demeanor. Despite all that is happening on the back, the Terrascope still sits smooth against the wrist. With only 100 meters water resistance, this watch is made for land, but can handle the sudden downpour or treacherous creek crossing, and if needed, you might use it to hammer nails.



Reviewing The JEANRICHARD Terrascope

Our Terrascope enjoys a luxurious construction, and the black dial may be the dressiest of the bunch, giving it more of an urban jungle predilection than of the jungles of South America.JEANRICHARD’s stated philosophy is “A new way of conceiving time. Caught up in the joy of discovery.” These watches are made for rugged exploration. Lacking male models in pinstripes to highlight the watch’s sophistication, we photographed it outside in its natural habitat, terra firma.

The JR Calibre: 11 ½ is a modified Sellita movement as opposed to the JR 1000, their only in-house movement used in their 1681 collection. As would be expected, the Calibre 11 ½ has 26 jewels, a 38 hour power reserve, and a 4hz frequency. Though nothing fancy, the watch boasts time tested specifications, giving it a workhorse movement for reliability.

This watch grew on us with each passing day. For a watch that has an endless supply of plain smooth steel, there was always something new to discover – a great testament to its design. First, there was the light, the gleam; then came the unfolding discovery of all the shapes, lines and geometry of an architect’s world; and finally the dial held a level of sophistication to match the overall testosterone. The only problem with reviewing such a watch is having to send it back.
New for the Terrascope is the distinctive black dial with its brushed-finish to match the satin-finished steel sections. Visually, the black dial seems the apotheosis of the Terrascope collection, which offers traditional dial colors like white or bolder choices like blue, dark green or aubergine, but the brushed black dial has a wow-factor that stays with you.

The mechanical features of the watch are straightforward: hour, minute, second with a date complication. The real features, however, are visual. For instance, when you view the dial from directly overhead, all you can see is stain-finished steel except for the outer polished edge, which continues onto the lugs. Rotate the watch on the wrist, and along the sides of the terraced case, new outlines of mirror-polished steel sparkle like facets on a diamond. At the top is an elevated round bezel, extending from an intermediate layer of four corners (think square), and at the bottom is a cushion-like foundation with curved sides much like parentheses. The 3-D effect of the outer case with its many edges looks like an architectural sketch. Normally fitting a round peg in a square hole is a bad idea, but the geometric shapes here defy convention.

The crown vaunts the JR logo, which is also etched on the case back. The crown has a beveled edge with deep wells, some of the only texture visible, but they are more for look than grip. Deploying the crown was a bit tricky because it was hard to grasp. Approaching it from the top and inserting a nail worked best, but it took trial-and-error to settle on this method.

The steel bracelet, despite the added grams of weight, makes the watch ultra-masculine. Can’t get to the gym? Just do curls with your Terrascope. The steel bracelet combines the same interplay of polished and brushed satin steel, its inner edges playing peek-a-boo with the polish. Since gleam is the selling point over texture, the steel bezel solidifies this theme 360 degrees around the wrist, and without a buckle for the butterfly release, the bracelet runs seamlessly from end to end.

On the dial, the index batons resemble the hands in their skeletal sandwiching of the applied lume with the ends left uncovered for greater visibility. Matching the outer 3-D appearance is the chapter ring’s inner slope with Arabic second/minute numerals in increments of five. The index at three o’clock is shortened to accommodate the date window, and kudos to JR for a black background and white date numbers.

The cushion case is signature JR DNA. Though no one would mistake this watch for a Patek Philippe Nautilus, they do seem to be telling a similar story; comparison, however, ends at a cursory, overall impression. Side by side, they are two completely different designs. The Terrascope is 46mm and with the bracelet, qualifies for the heavy weight division at 220 grams. The watch is a beast. Remember, it is bred for outdoor adventure.

The bold look of the case back’s engraved JEANRICHARD logo fits with the watch’s scale and contrasts against a matt background. The eight indentions for case back removal create a symmetry around the circumference and add to the watch’s tough demeanor. Despite all that is happening on the back, the Terrascope still sits smooth against the wrist. With only 100 meters water resistance, this watch is made for land, but can handle the sudden downpour or treacherous creek crossing, and if needed, you might use it to hammer nails.